NVIS Day April 23 @ EMA Station 720

We will be meeting at EMA Station 720 for NVIS day at 9am.

Marvin C. Gilbert EMA Operations Building - EMA Station 720
20900 Northwest Parkway
Marysville, OH 43040

Google Maps Link:
https://goo.gl/maps/9hT7PZfubpR2

Below are the details about NVIS day from the ARRL Ohio Section.
NVIS Day Details

BLUF (bottom line up front)
Ohio NVIS Day April 23          10 AM – 4 PM
100 watts maximum (to keep our signals consistent)

Suggested frequencies (but not limited to!)     
40 Meters:  7.240 – 7.244
75 Meters:  3.900 – 3.904
OHDEN (the Ohio Digital Emergency Net) will be operational)  3.584.5

EXCHANGE: 
(The most important information is how your antenna is working! )
Your County / location
A valid signal report
Extra:  send your 6-digit grid square if you know it
       Send a message. Use ~any~ format, any method (OHDEN, NTS, Black
Swan, etc.)

What is is all about?
What is more fun in amateur radio than fooling with antennas?  What
might be the most critical factor for a low-power HF station to get a
message out after a major disaster? What’s better than to gather with
a group of ham friends to enjoy a Spring day, lunch and some learning?

The Ohio ARES “NVIS Antenna Day” answers to all of the above! This
year’s antenna day is April 23, from 10 AM through 4 PM.  The purpose
is to learn about, construct, and test “Near Vertical Incident
Skywave” antennas and our ability to conduct communications within a
confined geographic area – usually about 400 miles or less.  In our
situation, we would like to be able to contact nearby counties and the
Ohio EOC station, W8SGT. 

NVIS antennas (called “cloudburners”) are very low wire antennas.
Because they’re close to the ground, the signal is reflected nearly
vertical and bounces back off the ionosphere very close to our own
location. We don’t want to work DX, we want to work as close in as
possible. There are many different designs (almost any wire antenna will
work!) and the fun part of NVIS day is to construct and set out a couple
different antennas to see which one works better in your location.
It’s a great time to teach beginners the art of building antennas from
scratch (measuring, cutting, soldering and deploying). These skills will
come in handy throughout your ham radio career!

For more information here are links to the two-part presentation made on
a national “RATPAC” seminar on NVIS:  https://youtu.be/2uZBp-vdB78 
and https://youtu.be/-PlT_L8IQ6k  They’re presented by some old guy
obviously faking his way through the topic.
Matt, KD8TTE, presents an excellent treatment (in case you get bored
with those two presentations.)

We will be operating from the Sarge at the Ohio EOC – and that’s a
primary objective since in a disaster we will need to communicate!  We
hope to hear you!